Accomodating various

Second, and most significantly, educators need to understand why standard academic practices do not work for SLD students and how they do learn.

The number of SLD students in colleges and universities is rising.

But the real frustration came when I was grading research papers. When measuring ideas, Albert was a genius, or at least he had the potential to excel.

One paper clearly stood out from the others: it was clear and artfully written, filled with specific support for a provocative idea. When measuring his academic abilities - the abilities to interpret assignments or negotiate the mechanics of college - Albert was incompetent. I think he had the potential to learn more in my class than he did, but the standard practices of education didnt work for him.

Students who, like Albert, do not learn well in traditional educational situations are often labeled learning disabled. Learning disabled literally means not able to learn and creates a stigma for learning disabled students.

Applying this label--whether by teachers, parents, peers, and even the students themselves--can make such students feel they are stupid or below normal intelligence.

He stares at the books for a minute, turns to face the class, and announces, as if he had just awakened: "I just dropped my textbooks in the library return chute." He turns and runs back out again to few muffled titters from the class.If teachers recognize and understand the needs of SLD students, they can begin to accommodate these needs with resources at hand.Some technological resources include specific assistive devices for SLD students and are offered through campus support services.About ten minutes late, Albert runs into the computer lab seemingly dazed.He's holding two library books in his hands like someone holds a food tray. I'm trying not to draw attention to him, so I continue my instructions and avert my gaze.