Archaeology radiocarbon dating

The incredible find has been hailed by Professor Vince Gaffney, from the University’s IBM Visual and Spatial Technology Centre, as one of the most significant yet for those researching the UK’s most important prehistoric structure.The new henge was uncovered this week, just two weeks into a three-year international study that forms part of the multi-million Euro international Stonehenge Hidden Landscapes Project.Using the latest geophysical imaging techniques, which "see" below the ground without excavation, it is possible to make out a dark circle of interrupted ditch.There are two wider gaps opposite each other - these were entrances to the monument and are aligned on the midwinter sunset and midsummer sunrise - like Stonehenge itself.Evidence for a second stone circle was found close to the River Avon, linked to Stonehenge itself by the Stonehenge Avenue.The circle is just under 10m in diameter and was surrounded by a henge – a ditch with an external bank – with an entrance to the east.

Contrary to press reports, Stonehenge was not a huge art gallery - these carvings are found only on four stones.Professor Gaffney, who this week won the Best Archaeological Book prize at the prestigious British Archaeological Awards for Europe’s Lost World: The Rediscovery of Doggerland, added: “Stonehenge is one of the most studied monuments on Earth but this demonstrates that there is still much more to be found.”Professor Wolfgang Neubauer, Director of the Ludwig Boltzmann Institute, adds: "This is just the beginning.We will now map this monument using an array of technologies that will allow us to view this new discovery, and the landscape around it, in three dimensions.It comprises a segmented ditch with opposed north-east/south-west entrances that are associated with internal pits that are up to one metre in diameter and could have held a free-standing, timber structure.The project, which is supported by the landowner, the National Trust, and facilitated by English Heritage, has brought together the most sophisticated geophysics team ever to be engaged in a single archaeological project in Britain.

Archaeology radiocarbon dating